Religious Humanism Comes of Age

[Editor's note: This text was first presented as a sermon at the Unitarian Universalist Society of Amherst, MA, 10/21/12. An shortened version of it appeared in the Fall 2012 issue of the journal, Religious Humanism.]

When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things. (I Corinthians 13:11)

I’ve come to realize that this simple description of the necessary transition from childhood to adulthood applies not just to individuals but also to cultures and societies, and ultimately to the human species itself. Read more about Religious Humanism Comes of Age »

Celebrating David E. Schafer, President Emeritus

One of the pleasures I had at the HUUmanists' yearly meeting a the 2013 UUA General Assembly was naming David Schafer our President Emeritus. David has been a friend and mentor for many years and I am personally grateful for all he has given the HUUmanists Assocation, including the years he spent as president from 2003 - 2010 and his on-going service on our Board.

 

Here is a David's abbreviated biography: Read more about Celebrating David E. Schafer, President Emeritus »

"Why I Am a UU Humanist", by Brian Lofgren

Editor's note: this is the first in a series of essays on this topic. Please, share your story.

Why I Am a UU Humanist

In my case, it took thirty-nine years to arrive as a Unitarian Universalist (UU) Humanist. I’m writing this essay just nine years beyond that memorable crossroad. I was raised in Christian culture. Like my Methodist parents and grandparents, I was conditioned from childhood to suspend critical thinking where religion was concerned, and just believe. This message was reinforced in the Lutheran school I attended from fourth, through eighth grade.

The popular God, the “Everything-God”, was the 'face' that personified not only the known, but the vast unknown. Religious systems may help followers meet some of their emotional, psychological, and social needs. However, readily accepting mythical-sounding stories as fact came at a cost. Read more about "Why I Am a UU Humanist", by Brian Lofgren »

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