June 2013

Standing on the Side of Love

Committed as we are to the goal of compassionate action in all human interactions, the HUUmanist Association commends the United States Supreme Court for the ruling in United States v. Windsor that the federal government may not discriminate against same sex unions.  To treat some marriages as less worthy of federal recognition than others is to deny the inherent worth and dignity of the persons joined in such unions.  Our hearts have cried out against such discrimination and now we rejoice that it has been found unconstitutional.  We also celebrate that same sex marriages will again be permitted in California.  It's beautiful to see the "arc of justice" bending into a rainbow.

Although grateful for these developments, the HUUmanist Association will not be satisfied until same sex marriages can be contracted in every state in the land, until same sex marriages entered into in any state are recognized in all states, and until all of the other ways in which sexual minorities are marginalized throughout the country are repealed or struck down.  Equality and justice for all. Read more about Standing on the Side of Love »

The Supreme Court and the VRA

As we celebrate the progress made toward recognizing the rights of our LGBT members and allies, let us not forget that a grave injustice has been done this week to our members and allies who have lost the protection of Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act.  Shame on the Supreme Court for opening the door for the suppression of the right of people of color to vote.  We support a Constitutional Amendment to guarantee a fair, free and accessible right to vote for every citizen of voting age in this country. Read more about The Supreme Court and the VRA »

Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA

The HUUmanists Association is proud to announce the availability of the latest book from the Religious Humanism Press, Regaining Balance: The Evolution of the UUA, by Michael Werner. Mike is an ardent Humanist and Unitarian Universalist having been past President of the American Humanist Association, Vice President of the Fellowship of Religious Humanists, President of the Humanist Foundation, President of the Unitarian Church of Charlotte, a founder of SMART recovery, and an adjunct faculty member of the Humanist Institute. He supports a balanced Humanism of heart and mind, reason and compassion and a Unitarian Universalism that helps us discover how to be more fully human.

Here is what some people are saying about the book:

“In this book Mike Werner analyzes what is wrong with the UUA and suggests how we can correct our problems and become once again a vital and growing religious movement.  It should be read by every UU who cares about the future of our Association.”  
-- William R. Murry, Former President and Dean, Meadville Lombard Theological School

President’s Corner

The HUUmanists Association has experienced another year of accomplishment in our quest to be a stronger voice for reason and compassion in Unitarian Universalism and in our society at large.  In addition, we have broadened the scope of our vision by seeking to become a bridge to Unitarian Universalism for secular individuals and others who presently have no formal religious affiliation.  To these ends, our extraordinary officers and Board of Directors, made up of Humanist scholars, ministers, and lay leaders, have clarified and focused our Mission

The Humanist Unitarian Universalist (HUUmanists) Association is committed to Humanist principles of reason, compassion, and human fulfillment enumerated in the Humanist Manifestos and in the seven Principles of the Unitarian Universalist Association.  We seek (1) to promote a broad acceptance of Humanism in our society, particularly throughout the Unitarian Universalist Association and its congregations, and (2) to provide an active interface between Unitarian Universalists and the secular community. Read more about President’s Corner »

HUUmanists GA Booth to Feature Art ‘n Justice (Location 523)

Achieving Social Justice through art and literature will be a focus of the HUU booth, June 19-23 at the Louisville General Assembly.

Documentary film-maker Janet Fitch will present her program "Changing the Conversation on Gun Violence" and will be present at our booth throughout the week.  Stop by to learn how your congregation can get involved, and the times and locations of Janet’s presentations.

The fabric arts panels crafted by two dozen UU and humanist artists from around the country, will make up the "Ribbon" for Immigrant Rights, on display at our booth, and shown outside several major GA events.  Panels depict themes from the Arizona Banned Books, and Immigration related projects carried out by UU congregations and Humanist groups. Read more about HUUmanists GA Booth to Feature Art ‘n Justice (Location 523) »

Humanist Events at General Assembly

Beyond Congregations: The Humanist Community Project at Harvard

Saturday, June 22, 5:30 – 6:45 p.m.

Convention Center 109-112

Several recent studies have revealed that a rapidly changing percentage of young people are affiliating with no religious tradition. The Humanist chaplain at Harvard University, founder and leader of a vibrant secular community organization, will describe a unique response to “the rise of the nones” that is succeeding beyond expectations.  Our speaker is Gregory M. Epstein, Humanist chaplain at Harvard University, who will be joined by Dr. John B. Hooper, president of the HUUmanists.



HUUmanists Annual Meeting

Saturday, June 22, 6:50 – 8:20 p.m. – Convention Center 109-112 Read more about Humanist Events at General Assembly »

"Religious Humanism" Journal – Next Issue

Appling Science to Theology

...is the theme running through the upcoming Spring 2013 issue of the Journal of Religious Humanism.  Papers delivered by Mark Belletini on Carl Sagan’s “Cosmic Theology,” and by Dawn Cooley on “Astrobiology” were delivered at last fall's Ohio River Group, a study gathering for UU Ministers.  Responses by their colleagues Lisa Friedman and Lisa Doege are included.

Mark Edmiston-Lange explores the extent to which evolution forms and teaches us about modern belief and religious life, and we reprise Sarah Voss’ “Matheology” - and evocation of “Cantorian Religion,” from an issue of RH about a decade ago.  Finally, since there are only two kinds of poetry that I like - the kind that rhymes and the kind that doesn’t, I included Roger Rochester’s thoughtful piece of doggerel on placing the human story in a larger context.

Volume 43, #2 will be mailed to members in July, and will be available for distribution at the General Assembly in Louisville, KY, June 19-22. Read more about "Religious Humanism" Journal – Next Issue »

In Search of UU Humanist Local Groups

Do you belong to a Humanist local group or do you wish there was one in your area?

We are attempting to create a list of all local groups that are either affiliated in some way with a UU congregation or that wish to reach out to UUs and get them involved. You can read more about the Local Groups project and see the current list by visiting the Local Groups page of this website.

If you are a group organizer, please add your group to the list by following the instructions on the website.  Being listed doesn't make you part of HUUmanists in any way, but it does show you acknowledge and support our mission to strengthen Humanism in the UUA and help us be a bridge between the secular community and the UU community.

If there is no Humanist group at your UU congregation or in your area, why not start one? At the link above you will also find resources for local groups, including an email list for organizers to seek and share advice.  (See the Seeding Humanist Groups article.) Read more about In Search of UU Humanist Local Groups »

Seeding Humanist Groups

From Pat Everett, admin of the "Seeding" Humanist Groups email list:

The "Seeding" Humanist Groups email list was launched at the 2011 UUA GA, and now has 70 members.  The aim is to share ideas and enthusiasm for seeding new Humanist groups across the country, generally out of existing UU congregations, perhaps also in other ways. Join at http://groups.google.com/group/seeding-humanist-groups.

The Concord Area Humanists (CAH), formed four years ago in Concord, Mass, is now successful enough to propose as a possible model, but not as a limitation.  Those in CAH will also be looking for new ideas to improve its performance and help it grow further.  Read more about Seeding Humanist Groups »

An essay contest: Why I Am a UU Humanist

Stories help bind people together. We want to know why you, as a Humanist, have found a home in a Unitarian Universalist congregation. For instance, how long have you been a Humanist and how did that happen? How long have you been a UU and why? We want to hear your thoughts on what Humanism has to offer UU congregations and what being a UU can offer Humanists.

Don't limit yourself to these questions, though. Inspire us! Share with us and each other what you get from being a Humanist UU or challenge us with what you think is missing. Does the UU community satisfy your need for friendship, intellectual stimulation, social service, inspiration? How can it be a more welcoming environment for Humanists? Tell us your story. Read more about An essay contest: Why I Am a UU Humanist »